The Madrassa of Style: God Forgives, John Cravatta Doesn't Posted on 02 Sep 10:16

This distinguished French gentleman’s name is Henri Le Blanc. A long time ago, way before the advent of the personal computer and the GAMEBOY, he wrote a fascinating book entitled “The Art of Tying the Cravat,” which you can now download for free.

This book has been written in 1828, but don’t think for a second that it is passé. To the contrary, Le Blanc’s sense of style and elegance could easily rival the one of nowadays’ most renown self-appointed “fashion experts”.

Take a look at this description regarding the “cravat sentimentale”, for example.

The name alone of this cravat is sufficient to explain that it is not alike suitable to all faces. You then, whose nature has not gifted with skins of silk – eyes of fire – with complexions rivalling the rose and lily: – you to whom she has denied perly teeth and coral lips (a gift which in our opinion would be rather inconvenient) – you, in fact, whose faces does not possess that sympathetic charm, which in a moment, at a glance, spreads confusion o’er the senses, and disorder and troubles in the hearts of all who behold you – be careful of how you expose to public gaze a head like that of a peruquier. We repeat – avoid it; and be assured that if your physiognomy does not does not inspire sensations of love and passion and you should adopt the cravat sentimentale, you will be a fair butt for the shafts of ridicule which (with no unsparing hand) will be showed upon you on all sides”.

How magnificently politically incorrect, I say! Despicable me! Chapeau. À propos, today isn’t the first Wednesday of the month, but let me say something serious anyway: when I’ll become King of the World, all the men that wear shorts&sandals away from the beach will be lapidated and then fed to the lions for good measure. God forgives, John Cravatta doesn’t. And this admirable marvel of a man who was Henri Le Blanc, reminds us that style is about rules to follow. There are people out there who don’t like to follow rules and consequently dislike fashion. But you see? You really have to be careful when you go about your business, because there’s plenty of people out there, in the world. People can be harsh at times and they will judge you. It isn’t called the urban jungle for no reason, after all. We would all love to live in a perfect world, a world in which nobody will judge books by their covers and people from their dresses. But, like Bob Dylan would put it: that ain’t the case, babe! The world is what it is: it isn’t bad or good, it is only what it is. And you have to take it for granted, like it or not. Moreover, consider that the world will become worse indeed. When I come to power I will make sure that everybody reads Le Blanc’s book from cover to cover at least once a week. It will be like the madrassa of style. Nobody will be allowed to wear the wrong thing at the wrong time and in the wrong place, under penalty of death. I’m considering lapidation, or perhaps decapitation, but I haven’t decided yet. Decapitation sounds interesting, but I’ll have common’s people blood all over my pavement…

You might think this is a bit harsh, but that’s only because you have unfortunately allowed modern thinking to take over reasoning. But seriously, it really doesn’t take much to dress like a man and if you don’t do it people will take you for a kid. I’m not kidding you. You must be aware of the fact that your clothes should be of the right size, the right material, according to the season, the appropriate colors and they should be well ironed and not stained. Furthermore, the accessories you wear must be adequate not only to the occasion, but also to your clothes: watches, belts, hats, you name it. It is not about fashion, really: it’s about not being sloppy.

Pardon me, if I feel like Henri Le Blanc: you then, whose nature has not gifted with reason , you to whom she has denied wisdom and critical thought (a gift which in our opinion would be rather inconvenient) – you, in fact, whose faces does not possess that sympathetic charm, which in a moment, at a glance, spreads confusion o’er the senses, and disorder and troubles in the hearts of all who behold you – be careful of how you expose to public gaze. I might be there watching you. Remember: God’ forgives, John Cravatta doesn’t.